conservation

3 Family Friendly Marine Conservation Projects

Marine Conservation Graphic

Here are 3 easy marine conservation projects to get involved in this summer, which require no previous training and are easy for children of any age to engage with:
1) Beach Babies Survey – Lots of animals are changing the time of year that they breed in response to warmer or cooler waters. ‘Capturing Our Coast’ are interested in how this varies around the UK. They have put together an activity pack that will help you spot a number of species and their signs of reproduction. You can find all the details here.
2) The Great Eggcase Hunt – With over 600 species of skate and ray worldwide, at least 16 species have been regularly recorded in UK coastal waters; most of these species reproduce by laying tough leathery eggcases on the seabed. Of more than 30 species of British sharks, only two species lay eggcases that are commonly found on our beaches; the Smallspotted Catshark and the Nursehound.
Each eggcase contains one embryo which will develop over several months into a miniature shark, skate or ray. Once empty, the eggcases often wash ashore and can be found among the strandline on beaches.
The Great Eggcase Hunt aims to get as many people as possible hunting for eggcases that have either been washed ashore, or are found by divers and snorkelers underwater. In recent decades, several species of shark, skate and ray around the British coast have dramatically declined in numbers. The empty eggcases (or mermaid’s purses) are an easily accessible source of information on the whereabouts of potential nursery grounds and will provide the Trust with a better understanding of species abundance and distribution.
3) Great British Beach Clean – The Great British Beach Clean is the Marine Conservation Society’s annual event on the 3rd weekend of September. It’s the biggest beach clean and survey in the UK and provides a valuable insight into the litter problems our seas and oceans are facing
MCSUK have been recording this information for over 25 years and lobbying governments to stop items getting there in the first place. With the publics help they’ve made great progress in helping to bring in a plastic bag charge, stopping microplastics in cosmetics being washed down the plug hole and getting the message out that wetwipes shouldn’t be flushed or contain plastic. Find out how to get involved in an existing beach clean, or how to organise your own, here.